Archive for December, 2010

Slow Advice, Fast Growth

Wednesday, December 29th, 2010

You’ve heard of the Slow Food movement? I’d like to recommend something similar for those dispensing business advice. These days, a lot of people are trying to force-fit whatever they’re selling into every situation, and they make their fast food one-size-fits-all approach sound haute cuisine by saying they’ll coach you.

Yuck.

Read the rest of this entry »

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The Tyranny of Connectivity

Monday, December 27th, 2010

[I've posted this before, but it seems an appropriate gift for readers during this holiday season]

Recently I decided to take a snow day. I had just completed a major project, and the prospect of going out did not entice. Over coffee, watching the blizzard, I happily made mental lists of books to read and articles to write.

Eight hours later I gave up.

In between, I rode the never ending wave of email, tweets, news feeds, text messages, etc. I was busy. I felt productive. But it was delusion. I kept up, but went nowhere. Read the rest of this entry »

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Entrepreneurs, Where Can You Find Help?

Monday, December 20th, 2010

It’s a big bad world out there. Anyone who says they never need help is either lying or in denial. But when it’s your company, it is often difficult to know where to turn. Here is a brief list of thought-starters. Read the rest of this entry »

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Measuring the Right Things – the Right Way

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

[This post is excerpted from our new ebook, ROADMAPP]

Peter Drucker, the grand old man of management theory, famously wrote, “What gets measured gets managed.” In other words, Metrics determine what you focus on. After all, who wants a bad report card? If you are tracking your Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s) regularly, you’re likely to find ways to improve them.

Which can be good or bad.

Because if Drucker is right (and he is, he is, trust me on this if nothing else), consider the implication: if you choose the wrong KPI’s, you or your organization will end up getting better at the wrong things. Read the rest of this entry »

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Unique Employees Need Unique Development Plans

Monday, December 13th, 2010

Unique Employees Need Unique Development Plans

So here’s a radical idea: people are different and therefore need different professional development plans.

To which you say, “Duh!”

But have you considered the implications? If the cookie-cutter approach is wrong, what is right? Read the rest of this entry »

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Resilience Can Be a Verb: Just Do It!

Wednesday, December 8th, 2010

Resiliency has many dimensions. It is a quality, an attitude, an ability. But most importantly, it is a choice and that means it is an action – a verb, albeit a little known one.

The action of resiliency is defined by Dictionary.com as “to spring back.” In response to unexpected, adverse situations that might leave others flattened, the resilient person bounces back.

But Nietzsche was only half right when he wrote “Whatever doesn’t kill me makes me stronger” in Twilight of the Idols. Unless you choose to use adversity to become stronger, you can be left wounded and weaker. Read the rest of this entry »

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Selling vs Helping: SPINning Your Way to Better Results

Monday, December 6th, 2010

You’ve got a business. You need to grow it. What should you do first? Meaning no disrespect to my colleagues who specialize in sales, let me suggest you don’t start selling. Until you have deep insight into what your prospective customers need and have used that insight to earn their trust, don’t even think of trying to sell – that is, if you think of selling as trying to close. The best salespeople know that closing is simply the last step of a complex process during which your main task is to seek insight – to ask questions, shut up, and listen. Read the rest of this entry »

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How to Keep Employees Accountable for Results

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010

[This post is excerpted from our new ebook, ROADMAPP]

Have you ever gone to bed smiling because you knew that in the morning someone would hand you an urgent report or confirm a critical meeting or handle a crucial situation? Then not been able to sleep the next night because the big event didn’t happen?

Happens all the time. Schedules slip and no one tells you. People promise to do something and forget. Or maybe hope that you’ll forget.

That’s where Accountability comes in. Read the rest of this entry »

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