Posts Tagged ‘change management’

Why Doesn’t Leadership Training Work?

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

While listening recently to an excellent audiobook by James Hunter (The Servant Leadership Training Course), I was not surprised to learn that on average only 10% of corporate leadership training attendees implement sustained behavioral change. This factoid confirmed what I have observed over the past 30 years: that training programs often get people’s heads nodding about the need for personal change, but then fail to drive change.

Now I find a fine article by Marshall and Kelly Goldsmith that argues that the problem is not with the training, but with attendee’s level of caring and commitment. Read the rest of this entry »

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What Makes P&G Great

Monday, February 21st, 2011

Last summer I was invited to visit Procter & Gamble’s headquarters in Cincinnati. I was filled with nostalgia, for that is where I began my career in marketing and general management long ago, and I had not been back in over two decades. At first I was struck with the strangeness of the place. There was a coffee bar in the lobby, turnstiles blocked the elevators, and I recognized few faces. But by the time I left, I realized that the truth was more complex, and therein lies the secret of P&G’s continuing success.

Read the rest of this entry »

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The New Brand Management Model

Friday, January 21st, 2011

Consumer marketing has changed in significant ways this decade due to the growth of social media and other communication channels. Here are some of the biggest shifts.

During the classic era of CPG marketing, focus was easy. Now, not so much.

Back then, marketing managers had a handful of clear priorities: business planning and execution to deliver results, product development, research & analysis, training newbies, and advertising (which primarily meant TV, sometimes supplemented with PR, magazines, radio, POS, billboards, and sales collateral). In the classic model, one functional group served as hub of the wheel, controlling and coordinating all internal and external activities related to the product or brand. It was all about one brand, one position, one message.

Today that model has been blown up by complexity. Read the rest of this entry »

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How to Keep Employees Accountable for Results

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010

[This post is excerpted from our new ebook, ROADMAPP]

Have you ever gone to bed smiling because you knew that in the morning someone would hand you an urgent report or confirm a critical meeting or handle a crucial situation? Then not been able to sleep the next night because the big event didn’t happen?

Happens all the time. Schedules slip and no one tells you. People promise to do something and forget. Or maybe hope that you’ll forget.

That’s where Accountability comes in. Read the rest of this entry »

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Micro-Managing? 5 Steps to Stopping

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

Many managers got to their positions by being very good at a particular function. Not surprisingly, they want to be deeply involved in their subordinates’ projects – after all, the manager has been doing it longer and more successfully. Almost always, he has a better idea and doesn’t hesitate to share it. Unfortunately, this is often counterproductive. Subordinates feel stripped of ownership, become demotivated, and perform poorly.

Fortunately, you can reprogram yourself to stop micro-managing. Here’s a straightforward 5 step process that will wean you from your bad habit and help liberate your team’s potential…without abdicating your responsibility to get great results. Read the rest of this entry »

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Response-Ability, or How to Raise the World’s IQ in One Easy Step

Thursday, August 5th, 2010

SUMMER VACATION! Following is a reprint of a popular post from earlier this year:

Doesn’t it seem sometimes like the world is filled with irresponsible idiots? Wouldn’t your job be easier if they just got a clue and did what they obviously need to do?

Let me give you an example of corporate idiocy. Read the rest of this entry »

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Embracing Resistance

Tuesday, July 13th, 2010

When I look back on mistakes I’ve made over my career, I find the same scenario repeated with embarrassing frequency: another manager opposed change that I was trying to implement, and I saw him or her as my enemy. This is top of mind this week after rereading a lecture by Susan Skjei of Naropa University, where I recently completed a course called “Authentic Leadership.”

One of Susan’s points is that all change provokes resistance. If there is no resistance, chances are the change is either illusory (a repackaging of the status quo) or bound for failure.

In other words, resistance is not only natural, it’s a signal that we’re on the right path. Read the rest of this entry »

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First, Kill All the Social Marketers!

Thursday, July 8th, 2010

Shakespeare famously had King Henry VI suggest decimating England’s population of lawyers. Paul Dunay recently echoed this in his blog:

…2 years from now – if I still have a Director of Social Media – I should be fired!…

The theory here is as CMO’s appoint a head of social media in their organizations, it fosters silo-like behavior Read the rest of this entry »

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New Economy? What’s Changed?

Wednesday, May 5th, 2010

Every decade or so, conventional wisdom proclaims that The Game Has Changed Forever! But has it really?

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