Posts Tagged ‘engagement’

Two Questions that Lead to Growth – for Everyone

Monday, April 4th, 2011

Are you creating the opportunities you’ll need for a highly successful career? In Insights for the Journey, John Lucht suggests asking yourself two questions in order to stay on a growth path:

  • “How can I re-distribute my work in order to provide a more richly developmental experience for each subordinate?”
  • “What can I offer to take over from my boss that will give him or her helpful support and, at the same time, give me needed stimulation and growth?”

Why are these two questions critical? Read the rest of this entry »

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Engaged, or Merely Checked-In?

Thursday, March 10th, 2011

[reprint of previous post, and once again I am in the same situation]

Today is the last day of a lovely vacation. I am well tanned, well fed, and emotionally, well, chaotic. This is how I get during transitions: swirling. Half distraught about leaving the beach so soon, half delighted about the coming challenges. Today I am the putty pulled between these two poles.

I know this territory. I’ve visited it often over the decades. And I’ve learned that how I feel over the next week or two has everything to do with how I manage my energy on Monday morning.

When I assess a new client’s – or my own – well-being, relational energy is a major KPI. We have only four ways of relating to our challenges. We can be:

  • Checked-out
  • Checked-in
  • Engaged
  • Obsessed

Read the rest of this entry »

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The New Brand Management Model

Friday, January 21st, 2011

Consumer marketing has changed in significant ways this decade due to the growth of social media and other communication channels. Here are some of the biggest shifts.

During the classic era of CPG marketing, focus was easy. Now, not so much.

Back then, marketing managers had a handful of clear priorities: business planning and execution to deliver results, product development, research & analysis, training newbies, and advertising (which primarily meant TV, sometimes supplemented with PR, magazines, radio, POS, billboards, and sales collateral). In the classic model, one functional group served as hub of the wheel, controlling and coordinating all internal and external activities related to the product or brand. It was all about one brand, one position, one message.

Today that model has been blown up by complexity. Read the rest of this entry »

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Managing the Free Agent Job Market

Friday, January 7th, 2011

Are you old enough to remember how free agency revolutionized baseball in the 70′s? Suddenly the whole concept of “team” was up for grabs. Many of us purists were horrified as the Yankees found they could buy championships by snapping up available stars.

Today, there is no more debate. Free agency is the water all sports teams swim in. And despite our fears, professional sports remain fascinating. Despite rapid turnover of players, teams command loyalty.

Less commented on has been the revolution of free agency in the business world. After brutal rounds of downsizing and restructuring in the 80′s and 90′s, most businesspeople no longer regard their companies as family but rather as stepping stones. And you know what? It’s OK. Read the rest of this entry »

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A Twitter Manifesto

Wednesday, January 5th, 2011

I love Twitter. It has helped me meet several remarkable thought leaders and given me a new venue for sharing my own ideas. So it distresses me to see how rapidly Twitter is getting devalued by junk. You know, the programs that troll for followers, push the same generic automated tweets through subscribers’ feeds, and litter the twitosphere with garbage.

This is my reply to Twitter Trolls and those folks who promise to make you rich and famous if you buy their software, program, or advice. It’s a personal manifesto. Read the rest of this entry »

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Unique Employees Need Unique Development Plans

Monday, December 13th, 2010

Unique Employees Need Unique Development Plans

So here’s a radical idea: people are different and therefore need different professional development plans.

To which you say, “Duh!”

But have you considered the implications? If the cookie-cutter approach is wrong, what is right? Read the rest of this entry »

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Abundance! The Power of Accepting What Is

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010

One weekend last year, the kids and I decided to go to a movie, then roller skate. We were excited by the plan and chatted happily during the car ride. But the movie upset my 7-year-old, with animals killing each other for survival (G-rated! What were they thinking?), and when the skating rink turned out to be closed, she burst into tears. “I didn’t like the movie and now I can’t even skate! Now I’ll never have fun!”

I immediately was flooded with feelings. First, of course, I felt like the world’s worst dad. Read the rest of this entry »

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Marking Your Territory

Tuesday, October 5th, 2010

Many managers are like my dog. They are perpetually compelled to leave their mark for others to admire or fear. Someone comes up with an idea and wham! they’ve got an improvement. They add value everywhere. And they undermine their success. Because sometimes you can add the most value by saying nothing.

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Can Leaders Cultivate Humility?

Thursday, September 23rd, 2010

Successful leaders are often an odd blend of ego and humility. Arguably, they need both – the one to move boldly and courageously, the other to stay alert for potential errors and to avoid overwhelming others. For most leaders I’ve known over the past 30 years, the hubris came easily. Their challenge was to learn to cultivate humility. Here are some tips. Read the rest of this entry »

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Passion and Leadership: A Primer

Monday, September 20th, 2010

“Passion” has been one of this decade’s buzzwords. Leaders must be passionate. Employees must be passionate. Entrepreneurs must be passionate. But can one be successful without passion?

A respected colleague, Dave Taylor, argues that passion is overrated, that business people should follow the money, addressing whatever opportunities that fit their skill set. Read the rest of this entry »

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Organizations with Heart

Friday, August 27th, 2010

Last winter spent a football Sunday with the father of a friend. He had spent his career at IBM, while I had spent 9 years at Procter & Gamble, and we fell into reminiscing. Both of us told tales of the two-way loyalty that defined life in those companies. Everything was expected of managers, but everything was given. They took care of their own. We were members of a tribe.

Oh my, how things have changed.

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Numbers or Impact? What Old Spice Teaches Us

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010

Last week, Dan Zarrella of HubSpot presented a webinar called The Science of Presentations with slides drawn from an ebook that was subtitled How to Give Contagious Talks. Therein lies the problem. Is “contagious” a useful measure of a presentation’s success? Is a successful presentation one that generates many live tweets with the appropriate hash tag?

Whatever happened to meaningful content? What if the primary purpose of the presentation is to influence a single decision maker, or a small group? When did the science of presentations become limited to viral?

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First, Kill All the Social Marketers!

Thursday, July 8th, 2010

Shakespeare famously had King Henry VI suggest decimating England’s population of lawyers. Paul Dunay recently echoed this in his blog:

…2 years from now – if I still have a Director of Social Media – I should be fired!…

The theory here is as CMO’s appoint a head of social media in their organizations, it fosters silo-like behavior Read the rest of this entry »

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Business and Honor: A Pledge

Sunday, June 20th, 2010

While rereading the remarkable Anatomy of Peace by The Arbinger Institute, an odd phrase popped into my mind: business with honor. Sounds kind of mafioso, doesn’t it? I tried to flick it away, another random bit of brain static, but something about it stuck. Honor and business. What’s the connection?

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Can’t Decide How to Decide? Here’s How – Part 2

Thursday, June 17th, 2010
Many leaders stumble when they need to make decisions. Some undermine team engagement by being too authoritative, thus endangering the quality of implementation. Others are so considerate to the feelings of others that decisions don’t get made at all or too slowly, or are dumbed down to the least objectionable compromise. Here we continue our series on How to Decide.

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